I've been served with a Supreme Court form

You've been served with a Supreme Court form.

Next, look at the name of the form. What form do you have?

Notice of Family Claim (Form F3)

The Notice of Family Claim (Form F3) is used to start a family law case in Supreme Court. The form will show what the person is applying for. It might be for orders to be made about:

  • parenting arrangements;
  • child or spousal support; or
  • property or debt.

They might also be applying for a divorce order.

If you don't agree with what the person is asking for and wish to respond, follow the steps in one of these guides:

Respond to an application to get an interim family order in Supreme Court

Step-by-step guide for how to respond if someone has started a family law case to get an interim order.

Respond to an application to get a new order in Supreme Court

Step-by-step guide for how to respond if someone has started a family law case to get a new final order.

Notice of Judicial Case Conference (Form F19)

A Notice of Judicial Case Conference (Form F19) means the other person involved in your case has already scheduled and booked a Judicial Case Conference (JCC) and is inviting you to attend on a particular time and date.

Deal with a Judicial Case Conference

Step-by-step guide for how to deal with a JCC. Steps 5 and 6 are relevant to respondents.

Notice of Application (Form F31)

A Notice of Application (Form F31) is used when the other person wants to change or enforce an existing order, or if they want to get an order to set aside (change) all or part of an agreement that's filed with the court.

Part 1 of the form will tell you what the person is applying to do. Choose one of the guides below.

Respond to an application to change a family order in Supreme Court

Step-by-step guide for how to respond if the other person is applying to change an existing order.

Respond to an application to enforce a parenting agreement or order in Supreme Court

Step-by-step guide for how to respond if the other person is applying to enforce an existing order.

Respond to an application to set aside all or part of an agreement in Supreme Court

Step-by-step guide for how to respond if the other person is applying to set aside all or part of an agreement.