Supreme Court Forms

F101: Affidavit (guardianship, Supreme Court)

Use this special Affidavit to apply to become the guardian of a child if you are a parent who doesn't have guardianship or a non-parent (relative or non-relative) who wants to become the child's guardian. An affidavit is a written statement that contains facts that you swear or affirm to be true to support your case. See How can you become a guardian? for more information about how to apply for guardianship.

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F30: Affidavit (Supreme Court)

A document that states facts that you swear under oath or affirm to be true in front of a commissioner for taking affidavits (could be a lawyer or notary public). Use this form to create an affidavit:

  • About income if you and the other party agree about the child support payor's income, but the payor doesn't have a copy of a recent income tax return/assessment to attach to the Agreement as to Annual Income (to explain why not).
  • In response to an application for interim family orders (when the parties don't agree).
  • In response to an application to change family orders for child or spousal support and/or parenting (when the parties don't agree).
  • To apply for alternative (substituted) service if you're applying to a judge/master for permission to serve documents in a different way than what's set out in the court rules (for example, because the other party is avoiding service).
  • To support an application for an interim family order (when the parties don't agree on the terms of the order).
  • To support an application to change a family order for child or spousal support and/or parenting (when the parties don't agree).
  • To postpone a Judicial Case Conference.

See Write a Supreme Court affidavit for help with what to put into your affidavit.

See a sample F30 form (pdf)

F86: Affidavit in Support of Order to Waive Fees

Use this form to list the facts that support your application for an order that says you don't have to pay court fees if you can't afford them. This affidavit must be sworn or affirmed.

F16: Affidavit of Ordinary Service

Use this form to prove in court that court documents have been delivered to the person they're intended for according to the rules of court.

See a sample F16 form (pdf)

F15: Affidavit of Personal Service

Use this form to prove in court that court documents have been personally delivered, by someone other than the parties involved, to the person they're intended for, according to the rules of court.

See a sample F15 form (pdf)

F38: Affidavit — Desk Order Divorce

Use this form to set out the required facts of the marriage and separation, and to give information about the children, if any, in an application for an undefended (uncontested) sole or joint divorce. It may also be used to apply for a consent order if you've resolved all the issues in your case but don't need a divorce (because, for example, you aren't married).

See a sample F38 form (pdf)

F9: Agreement as to Annual Income

Use this form if both parties agree on the income of the party who'll be paying child support. This form is simpler to complete than a Financial Statement (Form F8), and you won't need to swear or affirm the contents.

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Application Record Index

If you're going to Chambers, you need to create an Application Record, a loose-leaf ring binder that contains photocopies of the information and evidence you'll give to the judge/master. Use this form to create the table of contents and list all the documents in your Application Record.

See a sample form (pdf)

F55: Appointment

Use this form to book a time with the registrar to work out the terms of an order when you and the other party can't agree about what the judge ordered.

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F56: Certificate of Divorce

This form proves that you're divorced. It is signed and issued by the court registrar after your divorce is final.

See a sample F56 form (pdf)

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F36: Certificate of Pleadings

Use this form when you file your application for divorce. The court registrar must sign it to verify that your documents are in order before they send them to the judge.

F37: Child Support Affidavit

Use this form to outline what financial arrangements have been made for the children if you're applying for an undefended (uncontested) sole or joint divorce or to get a final consent order when all the issues are settled and you don't need a divorce.

See a sample F37 form (pdf)

F102: Consent for Child Protection Record Check

Use this form to give the court permission to carry out the necessary Ministry of Children and Family Development records check on you when you apply for guardianship of a child. See How can you become a guardian? for more information about how to apply for guardianship.

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F5: Counterclaim

Use this form to ask the court to make the orders you want for child or spousal support, parenting, or about family property or debt if you're responding to a Notice of Family Claim (F3). This document tells the court more about you and your spouse, the details of your marriage (relationship) and separation, and everything that you want the court to order.

See a sample F5 form (pdf)

F99: Demand

If you want the other party to use the new forms instead of documents filed before July 1, 2010, you can complete and serve a Demand (F99) on the other party, and the other party must file the requested document within 21 days of being served with the Demand.

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F96: Electronic Filing Statement

Use this form to confirm that the document you've e-filed shows your original signature and is a true copy of the original paper version of the document that you filed electronically.

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F95: Fax Cover Sheet

Use this form as a cover sheet when serving Supreme Court documents on the other party by fax.

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F52: Final Order

Use this form to set out the details of what you are asking the court to order after a hearing (except for a changed order, interim order, or order made without notice and without a hearing). For example, use it if you're making a joint or sole application for an undefended divorce. This form will become the final order for your divorce once it has been signed by the judge.

See Write a Supreme Court order for help with what to put into your order.

See a sample F52 form (pdf)

F8: Financial Statement

Use this form to tell the judge/master about your income, expenses, assets, and debts. Must be filed in some cases if you apply for child support, and in all cases when you apply for or respond to an application for spousal support or respond to an application for child support. See Complete a Supreme Court Financial Statement (Form F8) for information on how to fill out this form and what to do with it.

See a sample F8 form (pdf)

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F20: List of Documents

Use this form during the discovery process to list all the documents that you have or had in your possession or control that could be used by any party at trial to prove or disprove a material fact and all other documents that you intend to refer to at trial. That means you have to share documents even if they aren't helpful to you. You must serve the List of Documents on the other party. The other party can then ask for copies of any of the documents. You can’t use any documents at trial that you didn't include on your List of Documents. If you wish to add any documents, you must amend the form and serve it on the other party again.

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Litigants' Guide to Judicial Case Conferences

This isn't actually a form, but rather a guide to Judicial Case Conferences (JCC). Read it to prepare for your JCC.

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F10: Notice of Address for Service

Use this form to add or change the address at which you want to have documents served on you. You must fill out the form, file it at the court registry, and have it served on the other party before the change will take effect.

See a sample F10 form (pdf)

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F31: Notice of Application

Use this form if you've filed a Notice of Family Claim (F3) and are applying for an interim order or applying to change an order. You can also use this form to enforce a parenting order or agreement, or to set aside an agreement. It sets out what type of order you want, what evidence you'll use, what the legal basis is for the order, and how long you think the hearing will take.

See Write a Supreme Court order for help with what to put into your Notice of Application.

See a sample F31 form (pdf)

F39: Notice of Discontinuance

Use this form to end all or part of a family law case. This notice can be given only if a Notice of Trial (F44) hasn't been filed.

See a sample F39 form (pdf)

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F3: Notice of Family Claim

Use this form to start most family law cases, including an application for parenting, child or spousal support, or family property and debt orders. It sets out information about you and the other party, your relationship, and the final orders you want. If you're applying jointly with your spouse for any of these orders and/or a divorce, use a Notice of Joint Family Claim (F1).

Tip: The five schedules are in the PDF form but they don't appear when you first open the file. To make them appear, either:

  • Click "Fill In Form" at the top of the form, then tick the appropriate boxes under "My Claims" on page 2 (as soon as you tick each of the first five options, the schedule for that option appears at the bottom of the form). OR
  • Click "Prepare Paper Copy" at the top of the form and all five of the schedules will appear so you can print the form and fill it out by hand.

See a sample F3 form (pdf)

F48: Notice of Intention to Proceed

Use this form if there's been a delay of a year or more in your Supreme Court action (that is, no step has been taken) and you want to start it up again. This form notifies the other party that you want to continue with the court action, even though you may seem to have abandoned it.

F1: Notice of Joint Family Claim

Use this form to start an application for an undefended family law case if you're applying jointly with your spouse. You must agree on how to settle all your issues. This form sets out information about you and the other party, about your relationship, and about the final order you want.

Tip: The five schedules are in the PDF form but they don't appear when you first open the file. To make them appear, either:

  • Click "Fill In Form" at the top of the form, then tick the appropriate boxes under "I am asking for the following:" on page 1 (as soon as you tick each of the first five options, the schedule for that option appears at the bottom of the form). OR
  • Click "Prepare Paper Copy" at the top of the form and all five of the schedules will appear so you can print the form and fill it out by hand.

See a sample F1 form (pdf)

F19: Notice of Judicial Case Conference

File this form at the court registry to request a date and time for your Judicial Case Conference (JCC) and give it to the other party to let them know the date and time of the JCC. You're required to set and attend a JCC before applying for most contested family orders. There are some exceptions. See the relevant self-help guide for more information.

See a sample F19 form (pdf)

F11: Notice of Publication

Use this form to let the other party know that you've filed a Notice of Family Claim (F3) or Counterclaim (F5) by publishing a "legal notice" in, for example, the classified section of the local newspaper. The court may allow this alternative method of personal service if the person to be served can't be found or is avoiding service of the documents.

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F44: Notice of Trial

Use this form to officially schedule your trial. You can only file this form once you've reserved trial dates either at a Judicial Case Conference or with the Trial Coordinator at the court registry. You must file the Notice of Trial and serve it on the other party within 30 days of reserving your trial dates.

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F40: Notice of Withdrawal

Use this form if you change your mind and want to withdraw your Response to Family Claim (F4) or any of the individual claims made in your Response.

See a sample F40 form (pdf)

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F2: Notice of Withdrawal from Joint Family Law Case

Use this form if you decide you disagree with any claim filed in a Notice of Joint Family Claim (F1), and you no longer agree on the orders you want the court to make.

See a sample F2 form (pdf)

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F7: Notice of Withdrawal in Family Law Case in Which a Divorce Is Claimed

Use this form when you change your mind about any claim filed in a Notice of Family Claim (F3), a Response to Family Claim (F4), a Counterclaim (F5), or a Response to Counterclaim (F6) and you want to officially withdraw something you have put in one of these documents.

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F24: Notice to Admit

Use this form to ask the other party to "admit" the truth of certain facts and documents, usually facts that aren't controversial. This way neither of you has to take the time to prove them at trial. A Notice to Admit is an effective tool for speeding up your case and shortening the trial. The facts you agree to are called admissions.

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F43: Notice to Cross-examine

Use this form within 28 days of a Supreme Court trial in which you want to cross-examine the person who created a Section 211 child-related assessment for your case. See step 2 of Schedule and prepare for your Supreme Court trial for more information about how to use this form.

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F51: Order Made After Application

Use this form when you apply for an interim order or an order to vary (change) an existing order and the other party doesn't agree. Set out the details of what you want the judge to order. If the judge/master decides to grant the order you asked for, he or she will sign the form and it will become an official court order.

See Write a Supreme Court order for help with what to put into your order.

See a sample F51 form (pdf)

F51.1: Order Made at Judicial Case Conference

Use this form when you and the other party have agreed on terms at a Judicial Case Conference. Set out the details of what you have agreed to. If the judge/master decides to grant the order you have agreed to, he or she will sign the form and it will become an official court order.

See Write a Supreme Court order for help with what to put into your order.

See a sample F51.1 form (pdf)

F34: Order Made Without Notice

Use this form when you apply for an order without providing notice to the other party. Set out the details of what you want the judge/master to order. If the judge/master decides to grant the order you ask for, he or she will sign the form and it will become an official court order.

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F85: Order to Waive Fees

Use this form to draft the details of what you want the judge to order when you apply for an order to waive fees because you can't afford to pay court fees. If the judge/master decides to grant the order you ask for, he or she will sign the form and it will become an official court order.

F73: Petition to the Court

Use this form to start some types of family law cases, including when you apply to change a support or custody order made under the Divorce Act by a court outside BC if there is no existing family law case in BC. Other types of cases started by petition are listed in Supreme Court Family Rule 3-1.

See a sample F73 form (pdf)

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F54: Protection Order (Supreme Court)

Use this form to set out the details of what you want the court to order when you apply for an order to protect you or a family member. If the judge/master decides to grant the order you ask for, he or she will sign the form and it will become an official court order.

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JUS 280: Registration of Divorce

Use this form to register your divorce application with the federal government.

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PFA914: Request for Protection Order Registry Search

Use this form to give the court permission to carry out the necessary Permission Order Registry check on you when you apply for guardianship of a child. See How can you become a guardian? for more information about how to apply for guardianship.

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PFA 916: Request for Service of Family Protection Order

Use this form when you apply for a family law protection order to ask the court to arrange to serve (deliver) the granted protection order on the other party to avoid putting anyone at risk.

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F17: Requisition

Use this requisition to request something from the court or to accompany documents you're filing (for example, when you apply for a consent order or to apply for an exemption from a JCC). The self-help guides on this site set out when you need to use a Requisition (F17).

F17.1: Requisition (to file an agreement)

Use this requisition to accompany an agreement you're filing at the Supreme Court registry. File your agreement in Supreme Court sets out when you need to use this Requisition (F17.1).

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F35: Requisition (undefended family law case)

Use this requisition for an undefended (uncontested) family law case (for example, a desk order divorce). This form lists the documents that are filed with your application for an undefended family law case. You must file all the necessary documents or your application will be rejected.

See a sample F35 form (pdf)

F29: Requisition for Consent Order or for Order Without Notice

Use this requisition when you apply for an order where both parties agree or where no notice has been given to the other party. Or use it to apply for an order for substituted service (once you've tried everything you can to serve the documents on the other party). The requisition informs the court registry that you're applying for one of these orders.

F64: Summons to a Committal Hearing Under the Family Maintenance Enforcement Act

If your spouse continues to fail to pay child/spousal support (maintenance), use this form to ask the judge/master to order your spouse to attend a court hearing and explain. If your spouse doesn’t appear, he or she can be arrested and jailed.

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F63: Summons to a Default Hearing Under the Family Maintenance Enforcement Act

If your spouse fails to pay support/maintenance, use this form to ask the judge/master to order your spouse to attend a court hearing and explain.

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Supreme Court cover page (Blank)

Use this form to create a cover page for Supreme Court documents.

F45: Trial Brief

Use this form to describe your case and file it at the registry at least 7 days before your Supreme Court trial management conference. See step 3 of Schedule and prepare for your Supreme Court trial for more information about how to use this form.

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F46: Trial Certificate

File this form at the court registry at least 14 (but no more than 28) days before your trial starts to indicate that you're ready to start the trial, all examinations for discovery have been completed, how long you estimate the trial will take, and that the Trial Management Conference has been held. See step 9 of Schedule and prepare for your Supreme Court trial for more information about how to use this form.

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